Using Sex-Related Alcohol Expectancies to Predict Condom Use Among a General Sample of Men and Women in the United States

Joseph M. Currin, Julie M. Croff, Randolph D. Hubach, Bridget M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sex-related alcohol expectancies (SRAE) are known to moderate the relationship between alcohol use and risky sexual behavior in high risk populations; however, SRAEs have not been thoroughly explored in populations traditionally viewed at lower risk for HIV and/or STI. Participants (n = 649) were recruited through internet-based direct marketing in the United States. Predictors of SRAE vary by gender. Controlling for alcohol use and other predictors, age predicted condom use among women, and SRAE was correlated with condom use for men. Sexual health programming geared towards non-traditionally identified high-risk populations is necessary and provides unique opportunities to increase condom usage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-470
Number of pages12
JournalSexuality and Culture
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2017

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alcohol
direct marketing
programming
Internet
gender
health

Keywords

  • Alcohol use
  • Condom use
  • Expectancies

Cite this

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Using Sex-Related Alcohol Expectancies to Predict Condom Use Among a General Sample of Men and Women in the United States. / Currin, Joseph M.; Croff, Julie M.; Hubach, Randolph D.; Miller, Bridget M.

In: Sexuality and Culture, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. 459-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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