Using biplanar fluoroscopy to guide radiopaque vascular injections: A new method for vascular imaging

Haley O'Brien, Susan H. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studying vascular anatomy, especially in the context of relationships with hard tissues, is of great interest to biologists. Vascular studies have provided significant insight into physiology, function, phylogenetic relationships, and evolutionary patterns. Injection of resin or latex into the vascular system has been a standard technique for decades. There has been a recent surge in popularity of more modern methods, especially radiopaque latex vascular injection followed by CT scanning and digital "dissection." This technique best displays both blood vessels and bone, and allows injections to be performed on cadaveric specimens. Vascular injection is risky, however, because it is not a standardizable technique, as each specimen is variable with regard to injection pressure and timing. Moreover, it is not possible to view the perfusion of injection medium throughout the vascular system of interest. Both data and rare specimens can therefore be lost due to poor or excessive perfusion. Here, we use biplanar video fluoroscopy as a technique to guide craniovascular radiopaque latex injection. Cadaveric domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domestica ) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were injected with radiopaque latex under guidance of fluoroscopy. This method was found to enable adjustments, in real-time, to the rate, location, and pressure at which latex is injected in order to avoid data and specimen loss. In addition to visualizing the injection process, this technique can be used to determine flow patterns, and has facilitated the development of consistent markers for complete perfusion.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere97940
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 May 2014

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Fluoroscopy
Latex
blood vessels
Blood Vessels
image analysis
injection
Imaging techniques
latex
Injections
Sus scrofa
Perfusion
Odocoileus virginianus
Dissection
methodology
Physiology
Blood vessels
Flow patterns
Tunica Media
Bone
Pressure

Cite this

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Using biplanar fluoroscopy to guide radiopaque vascular injections : A new method for vascular imaging. / O'Brien, Haley; Williams, Susan H.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 9, No. 5, e97940, 16.05.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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