There are more things in heaven and earth ⋯

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current lack of strong osteopathic educational standards in osteopathic medical schools is contributing to the general decline of identity within the osteopathic profession. The challenge is raising educational standards in osteopathic medical schools without relying on the allopathic model of a medical education. Schools need to incorporate osteopathic principles into the basic science classes and show how these principles can be applied in all specialties. Additionally, there should be caution in the expansion of student numbers. To address the decline of identity in the general profession, the entire osteopathic profession needs to agree on a basic working defi nition of osteopathic medicine and adhere to it. If these can be accomplished, the profession will begin to be able to clearly delineate in thought and practice how osteopathic medicine is distinct from allopathic medicine. However, if we cannot do this, we risk losing the separate osteopathic medical profession.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-20
Number of pages4
JournalAAO Journal
Volume19
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2009

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Osteopathic Medicine
Medical Schools
Medical Education
Medicine
Students

Cite this

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title = "There are more things in heaven and earth ⋯",
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There are more things in heaven and earth ⋯. / Ching, Leslie Mae Geen.

In: AAO Journal, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.12.2009, p. 17-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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