The Impact of Protective and Compensatory Experiences (PACEs) on Resilience in Adults with Substance Use Disorder

Jake Romoser, Victor Do, Jordan Siegel, Alexis Wirtz, Faiz Safdar, Julie M. Croff, Kyle Simmons, Florence Breslin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Treatment models for substance use disorders are continually evolving, often placing a heavy emphasis on the role of self-agency, a capacity often shaped by the patient’s upbringing and ability to overcome adversity. Many studies show a well-defined connection between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), resilience, and substance use disorders later in life. However, there is little research into how these childhood experiences shaped those individuals who went on to develop a substance use disorder. Individuals with higher resilience have experienced more positive treatment outcomes, like prolonged periods of abstinence and lower relapse risks. Therefore, our study's objective is to examine the correlation between PACEs and resilience in patients undergoing treatment for a substance use disorder.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data collected from participants in the Project CANARY (Clinical and Neurological Augers of Recovery) registry which consists of adults currently in treatment for a substance use disorder. Data was collected through self-report surveys, including demographic information, PACEs, and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Pearson Correlations assessed the impact of these PACEs experiences on resilience from the CD-RISC. Post-hoc analysis examined the difference in PACEs groups ± 5 PACES, 1 standard deviation below the mean.

Results: Our analysis revealed a significant correlation between high PACE scores and increased resilience in adulthood (r=0.26, p=0.006). Participants with higher PACE scores (>5/10) demonstrated higher resilience scores, while less ACES is not significantly correlated.

Conclusions: The study’s findings show a significant correlation between PACEs and resilience in adulthood, underscoring the importance of nurturing positive childhood environments. Though adverse childhood experiences have long-lasting impacts, the presence of protective and compensatory experiences from childhood play a crucial role in bolstering resilience, thus offering valuable insights for potential therapeutic approaches in substance use recovery and mental health interventions. This could include future research into how newly acquired positive and protective experiences in adulthood, such as volunteering or a new hobby, could contribute to the patients’ ability to recover. The study advocates for a balanced perspective in childhood experience research, emphasizing not only the mitigation of adversities but also the promotion of positive experiences for long-term resilience and well-being.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages86
StatePublished - 16 Feb 2024
Event
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Research Week 2024
- Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, Tulsa, United States
Duration: 13 Feb 202417 Feb 2024
https://medicine.okstate.edu/research/research_days.html

Conference

Conference
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Research Week 2024
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityTulsa
Period13/02/2417/02/24
Internet address

Keywords

  • substance use disorder
  • PACEs
  • resilience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Impact of Protective and Compensatory Experiences (PACEs) on Resilience in Adults with Substance Use Disorder'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this