The first full body diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography dataset and teaching materials for a member of the Testudines

Jaimi A. Gray, Paul M. Gignac, Edward L. Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography (diceCT) is now a widely used technique for imaging metazoan soft anatomy. Turtles present a particular challenge for anatomists; gross dissection is inherently destructive and irreversible, whereas their near complete shell of bony plates, covered with keratinous scutes, presents a barrier for iodine diffusion and significantly increases contrast-enhanced CT preparation time. Consequently, a complete dataset visualizing the internal soft anatomy of turtles at high resolution and in three dimensions has not yet been successfully achieved. Here we outline a novel method that augments traditional diceCT preparation with an iodine injection technique to acquire the first full body contrast-enhanced dataset for the Testudines. We show this approach to be an effective method of staining the soft tissues inside the shell. The resulting datasets were processed to produce anatomical 3D models that can be used in teaching and research. As diceCT becomes a widely employed method for nondestructively documenting the internal soft anatomy of alcohol preserved museum specimens, we hope that methods applicable to the more challenging of these, such as turtles, will contribute toward the growing stock of digital anatomy in online repositories.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-548
Number of pages14
JournalAnatomical Record
Volume307
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • 3D imaging
  • 3D modeling
  • Testudines
  • computed tomography
  • diceCT
  • natural history
  • reptile

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