Spinal taurine levels are increased 7 and 30 days following methylprednisolone treatment of spinal cord injury in rats

Richard L. Benton, C. David Ross, Kenneth Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The amino acid taurine serves many functions in the nervous system serving as inhibitory neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, neurotrophin, antioxidant, and osmolyte. Taurine levels are increased following brain injury and glucocorticoid administration. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine spinal taurine concentrations following spinal cord injury (SCI) and methylprednisolone (MP) treatment of SCI. A total of 44 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and lesion groups. Control rats received a T6 vertebral laminectomy while lesioned rats received a laminectomy followed by complete spinal transection. Half of the animals in each group received MP intravenously following sham-operation or SCI. Rats survived for 7 or 30 days and concentrations of taurine in spinal gray and white matter, in spinal segments both near and distant from the injury epicenter, were resolved by HPLC analysis. Taurine levels were increased 7 and 30 days following transection in spinal segments immediately adjacent to the lesion and were further elevated by MP treatment. No increases were seen in far rostral/caudal segments, and MP treatment alone had no effect on spinal taurine levels. These findings demonstrate that spinal injury results in increased taurine concentrations in spinal segments undergoing the greatest degree of cellular reactivity and tissue reorganization and that MP therapy potentiates these increases. These findings are significant in that they further characterize the effects of acute MP therapy in spinal tissue. Since taurine is thought to be involved in neuroprotection and/or regeneration following injury, the potentiation of taurine levels by MP treatment may relate to its therapeutic properties.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-300
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Research
Volume893
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Mar 2001

Fingerprint

Taurine
Methylprednisolone
Spinal Cord Injuries
Laminectomy
Neurotransmitter Agents
Spinal Injuries
Nerve Growth Factors
Wounds and Injuries
Brain Injuries
Nervous System
Glucocorticoids
Sprague Dawley Rats
Regeneration
Therapeutics
Antioxidants
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Amino Acids
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Methylprednisolone
  • Spinal cord
  • Taurine
  • Trauma

Cite this

@article{5235bf88e20a48edb7691363e608d3e4,
title = "Spinal taurine levels are increased 7 and 30 days following methylprednisolone treatment of spinal cord injury in rats",
abstract = "The amino acid taurine serves many functions in the nervous system serving as inhibitory neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, neurotrophin, antioxidant, and osmolyte. Taurine levels are increased following brain injury and glucocorticoid administration. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine spinal taurine concentrations following spinal cord injury (SCI) and methylprednisolone (MP) treatment of SCI. A total of 44 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and lesion groups. Control rats received a T6 vertebral laminectomy while lesioned rats received a laminectomy followed by complete spinal transection. Half of the animals in each group received MP intravenously following sham-operation or SCI. Rats survived for 7 or 30 days and concentrations of taurine in spinal gray and white matter, in spinal segments both near and distant from the injury epicenter, were resolved by HPLC analysis. Taurine levels were increased 7 and 30 days following transection in spinal segments immediately adjacent to the lesion and were further elevated by MP treatment. No increases were seen in far rostral/caudal segments, and MP treatment alone had no effect on spinal taurine levels. These findings demonstrate that spinal injury results in increased taurine concentrations in spinal segments undergoing the greatest degree of cellular reactivity and tissue reorganization and that MP therapy potentiates these increases. These findings are significant in that they further characterize the effects of acute MP therapy in spinal tissue. Since taurine is thought to be involved in neuroprotection and/or regeneration following injury, the potentiation of taurine levels by MP treatment may relate to its therapeutic properties.",
keywords = "Methylprednisolone, Spinal cord, Taurine, Trauma",
author = "Benton, {Richard L.} and Ross, {C. David} and Kenneth Miller",
year = "2001",
month = "3",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02995-4",
language = "English",
volume = "893",
pages = "292--300",
journal = "Brain Research",
issn = "0006-8993",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

Spinal taurine levels are increased 7 and 30 days following methylprednisolone treatment of spinal cord injury in rats. / Benton, Richard L.; Ross, C. David; Miller, Kenneth.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 893, No. 1-2, 02.03.2001, p. 292-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spinal taurine levels are increased 7 and 30 days following methylprednisolone treatment of spinal cord injury in rats

AU - Benton, Richard L.

AU - Ross, C. David

AU - Miller, Kenneth

PY - 2001/3/2

Y1 - 2001/3/2

N2 - The amino acid taurine serves many functions in the nervous system serving as inhibitory neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, neurotrophin, antioxidant, and osmolyte. Taurine levels are increased following brain injury and glucocorticoid administration. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine spinal taurine concentrations following spinal cord injury (SCI) and methylprednisolone (MP) treatment of SCI. A total of 44 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and lesion groups. Control rats received a T6 vertebral laminectomy while lesioned rats received a laminectomy followed by complete spinal transection. Half of the animals in each group received MP intravenously following sham-operation or SCI. Rats survived for 7 or 30 days and concentrations of taurine in spinal gray and white matter, in spinal segments both near and distant from the injury epicenter, were resolved by HPLC analysis. Taurine levels were increased 7 and 30 days following transection in spinal segments immediately adjacent to the lesion and were further elevated by MP treatment. No increases were seen in far rostral/caudal segments, and MP treatment alone had no effect on spinal taurine levels. These findings demonstrate that spinal injury results in increased taurine concentrations in spinal segments undergoing the greatest degree of cellular reactivity and tissue reorganization and that MP therapy potentiates these increases. These findings are significant in that they further characterize the effects of acute MP therapy in spinal tissue. Since taurine is thought to be involved in neuroprotection and/or regeneration following injury, the potentiation of taurine levels by MP treatment may relate to its therapeutic properties.

AB - The amino acid taurine serves many functions in the nervous system serving as inhibitory neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, neurotrophin, antioxidant, and osmolyte. Taurine levels are increased following brain injury and glucocorticoid administration. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine spinal taurine concentrations following spinal cord injury (SCI) and methylprednisolone (MP) treatment of SCI. A total of 44 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and lesion groups. Control rats received a T6 vertebral laminectomy while lesioned rats received a laminectomy followed by complete spinal transection. Half of the animals in each group received MP intravenously following sham-operation or SCI. Rats survived for 7 or 30 days and concentrations of taurine in spinal gray and white matter, in spinal segments both near and distant from the injury epicenter, were resolved by HPLC analysis. Taurine levels were increased 7 and 30 days following transection in spinal segments immediately adjacent to the lesion and were further elevated by MP treatment. No increases were seen in far rostral/caudal segments, and MP treatment alone had no effect on spinal taurine levels. These findings demonstrate that spinal injury results in increased taurine concentrations in spinal segments undergoing the greatest degree of cellular reactivity and tissue reorganization and that MP therapy potentiates these increases. These findings are significant in that they further characterize the effects of acute MP therapy in spinal tissue. Since taurine is thought to be involved in neuroprotection and/or regeneration following injury, the potentiation of taurine levels by MP treatment may relate to its therapeutic properties.

KW - Methylprednisolone

KW - Spinal cord

KW - Taurine

KW - Trauma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035793955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02995-4

DO - 10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02995-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 11223021

AN - SCOPUS:0035793955

VL - 893

SP - 292

EP - 300

JO - Brain Research

JF - Brain Research

SN - 0006-8993

IS - 1-2

ER -