Sleepwalking and sleep-related eating associated with atypical antipsychotic medications: Case series and systematic review of literature

Amit Chopra, Rikinkumar S. Patel, Nisha Baliga, Anoop Narahari, Piyush Das

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Sleep walking (SW) is a parasomnia behavior characterized by repetitious occurrence of ambulation during a partial arousal from non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Sleep-related eating (SRE) is one of the complex sleep behaviors that may accompany SW. Emerging evidence suggests that NREM parasomnias can be associated with atypical antipsychotic medication use. Methods: We present a case series (n = 5) and a systematic review of the literature of cases of SW, with or without SRE (n = 23), associated with atypical antipsychotic use. Results: Twenty-eight cases of SW, with and without SRE, with a mean age of 44.8 years (S.D. = 15.04) and a male predominance (75%; n = 21) were identified. Quetiapine was the most commonly implicated medication with SW and SRE (n = 14). Remission from SW/SRE was noted in all cases with measures including antipsychotic dosage reduction, discontinuation of medication, switching to an alternate medication, and use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for comorbid obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treatment. Conclusions: Sleep walking (SW), with or without sleep related eating (SRE), can be a rare but reversible side effect associated with use of atypical antipsychotics. More research is warranted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying SW and SRE associated with atypical antipsychotic use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-81
Number of pages8
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atypical antipsychotics
  • Parasomnias
  • Sleep walking
  • Sleep-related eating
  • Weight gain

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