Scholarly research productivity among otolaryngology residency graduates and its relationship to future academic achievement

Austin L. Johnson, Adam Corcoran, Matt Ferrell, Bradley S. Johnson, Scott Mann, Jennifer Villwock, Matt Vassar

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that all residencies participate in research. This growing emphasis on research during residency has made it increasingly important for medical students to gain familiarity with the basic principles of research before beginning residency training. Thus, our goal is to determine if an association exists between publication rates before, during, or after otolaryngology residency training and whether publication efforts may predict future academic achievement. If such an association exists, perhaps otolaryngology residency program directors and education policymakers could use it as a predictive tool to screen future applicants. Methods: In this cross-sectional analysis, we selected a random sample of 50 otolaryngology residency programs listed on Doximity. From these programs, we assembled a list of graduating residents from 2013, 2014, and 2015. Using SCOPUS, PubMed, and Google Scholar, a list of publications for each graduate was compiled and data were extracted in an independent, double-blinded fashion by two investigators. Results: Of the 50 randomly selected otolaryngology residency programs included in this analysis, 27 (54%) programs representing 207 residents were included. Before residency, graduates published a mean of 0.7 (SD=2.3) articles and a mean of 0.2 (SD=0.8) first author publications. During residency, graduates published a mean of 4.1 (SD=5.0) articles and a mean of 2.2 (SD=3.2) first author publications. After residency, graduates published a mean of 5.4 (SD= 9.6) articles and a mean of 1.8 (SD=2.8) first author publications. Residents who pursued a fellowship had more publications (t205=-5.5, p <.001) and more first author publications (t205=-5.3, p <.001) than residents who did not pursue fellowship training. Residents who chose careers in academic medicine had a higher number of mean total publications (t205=-7.2, p <.001) and first author publications (t205=-7.0, p <.001) than those in private practice. Conclusion: Otolaryngology residency graduates are actively involved in research opportunities throughout their medical training. Research productivity significantly correlated with future fellowship training, the pursuit of an academic career, and overall h-index. Residents who published more research were more likely to enter fellowship training and academic careers. Our results indicate that promoting greater physician involvement in the research process may strengthen confidence in the interpretation and application of research findings and ultimately lead to future academic success.
Original languageAmerican English
StatePublished - 4 Sep 2020
EventOklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Research Day 2020 - Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine, Tulsa, United States
Duration: 27 Feb 202028 Feb 2020

Conference

ConferenceOklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Research Day 2020
CountryUnited States
CityTulsa
Period27/02/2028/02/20

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    Johnson, A. L., Corcoran, A., Ferrell, M., Johnson, B. S., Mann, S., Villwock, J., & Vassar, M. (2020). Scholarly research productivity among otolaryngology residency graduates and its relationship to future academic achievement. Poster session presented at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Research Day 2020, Tulsa, United States. https://shareok.org/handle/11244/324211