Rural Men Who Have Sex with Men’s (MSM) Experiences and Preferences for Outreach Health Programming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rural men who have sex with men (MSM) are particularly vulnerable to HIV/STI infections, though most outreach efforts to reach MSM have been focused on urban populations. More attention is needed to study effective ways of reaching/recruiting rural MSM, yet little is known about their preferences; particularly as studies show significant differences in the behaviors and perceptions of rural versus urban MSM. Our study uses a qualitative instrument to gauge what outreach methods are most effective from the perspective of 40, rural MSM. Outreach facilitators included online marketing, emphasizing rural areas, while outreach barriers included traditional forms of print media/advertising, or anything that may jeopardize anonymity. Implications for future outreach in rural areas and limitations are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-89
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of HIV/AIDS and Social Services
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jan 2019

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rural area
programming
Urban Population
print media
anonymity
Health
urban population
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Marketing
health
HIV Infections
experience
marketing

Keywords

  • MSM
  • barriers
  • facilitators
  • gay
  • marketing
  • outreach
  • preferences
  • rural

Cite this

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abstract = "Rural men who have sex with men (MSM) are particularly vulnerable to HIV/STI infections, though most outreach efforts to reach MSM have been focused on urban populations. More attention is needed to study effective ways of reaching/recruiting rural MSM, yet little is known about their preferences; particularly as studies show significant differences in the behaviors and perceptions of rural versus urban MSM. Our study uses a qualitative instrument to gauge what outreach methods are most effective from the perspective of 40, rural MSM. Outreach facilitators included online marketing, emphasizing rural areas, while outreach barriers included traditional forms of print media/advertising, or anything that may jeopardize anonymity. Implications for future outreach in rural areas and limitations are also discussed.",
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AU - Croff, Julie

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