Risk-taking patterns of female adolescents: What they do and why

Rita Shapiro, Alexander W. Siegel, Lori C. Scovill, Jennifer Hays-Grudo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A total of 58 college-age adolescent females were asked to provide information about their risk-taking behaviors. Participants completed a risk-taking questionnaire and were asked to keep a diary of their risk-taking behaviors for 1 week. Participants were also asked to provide reasons for engaging in each behavior they listed. Results indicated that participants engaged in a variety of risky behaviors ranging from traditional adolescent risk-taking behaviors, e.g. drinking and sex, to other behaviors not typically included in studies of risk-taking, e.g. interpersonal and financial risky behaviors. An analysis of the justifications given for engaging in the various behaviors were largely goal-oriented (e.g. engaging in a behavior as a means to an end) or reflected a preoccupation with personal needs (e.g. engaging in a behavior to relieve loneliness or stress). These results are contrary to the widely held belief that adolescents' risk-taking is 'mindless', 'aimless', or mere 'sensation seeking'.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-159
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1998

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Risk-Taking
Drinking Behavior
Loneliness
Sexual Behavior

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Shapiro, Rita ; Siegel, Alexander W. ; Scovill, Lori C. ; Hays-Grudo, Jennifer. / Risk-taking patterns of female adolescents : What they do and why. In: Journal of Adolescence. 1998 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 143-159.
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Risk-taking patterns of female adolescents : What they do and why. / Shapiro, Rita; Siegel, Alexander W.; Scovill, Lori C.; Hays-Grudo, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Adolescence, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 143-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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