Responding to peer victimisation in middle childhood: What is a victim to do?

Andrew M. Terranova, Paul Boxer, Amanda S. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children's responses to peer victimisation are thought to influence the duration of victimisation, yet research has not clearly indicated the best ways for young people to respond. In the current study, students (n = 403, mean age of nine years, 11 months, 55% female, 53% Caucasian) reported on their peer victimisation experiences and responses at the beginning and end of a school year. Teachers also reported on students' victimisation experiences. Cross-lagged path analysis indicated a reciprocal association between externalising responses and victimisation. Victimisation early in the school year also resulted in increased internalising responses. Findings also suggest that coping responses are more reliably linked to subsequent victimisation rates in young people who are not yet experiencing high levels of victimisation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Crime Victims
victimization
childhood
Students
path analysis
Caucasian
school
coping
experience
student
teacher
Research

Keywords

  • Bullying
  • Coping
  • Peer victimisation
  • School violence

Cite this

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title = "Responding to peer victimisation in middle childhood: What is a victim to do?",
abstract = "Children's responses to peer victimisation are thought to influence the duration of victimisation, yet research has not clearly indicated the best ways for young people to respond. In the current study, students (n = 403, mean age of nine years, 11 months, 55{\%} female, 53{\%} Caucasian) reported on their peer victimisation experiences and responses at the beginning and end of a school year. Teachers also reported on students' victimisation experiences. Cross-lagged path analysis indicated a reciprocal association between externalising responses and victimisation. Victimisation early in the school year also resulted in increased internalising responses. Findings also suggest that coping responses are more reliably linked to subsequent victimisation rates in young people who are not yet experiencing high levels of victimisation.",
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Responding to peer victimisation in middle childhood : What is a victim to do? / Terranova, Andrew M.; Boxer, Paul; Morris, Amanda S.

In: Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.09.2010, p. 15-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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