Neighborhood Cohesion as a Buffer Against Hostile Maternal Parenting

Jennifer S. Silk, Frances M. Sessa, Amanda Morris, Laurence Steinberg, Shelli Avenevoli

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored the moderating effects of children's neighborhoods on the link between hostile parenting and externalizing behavior. Participants were 1st- or 2nd-grade children in an urban northeastern community. Children were administered the Parenting and Neighborhood scales of the Child Puppet Interview, and mothers completed questionnaires on neighborhood quality and parenting practices. Census tract measures of neighborhood quality and teachers' reports of children's externalizing behavior also were obtained. Results indicated that children's and mothers' perceptions of neighborhood involvement-cohesion buffered the link between hostile parenting and externalizing problems. Children's externalizing behavior was unrelated to census tract variables. Findings highlight the protective effect of neighborhood social cohesion and the utility of including young children's perspectives in research on neighborhoods and families.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-146
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2004

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Parenting
Buffers
Mothers
Child Behavior
Censuses
Angelman Syndrome
Interviews
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Silk, Jennifer S. ; Sessa, Frances M. ; Morris, Amanda ; Steinberg, Laurence ; Avenevoli, Shelli. / Neighborhood Cohesion as a Buffer Against Hostile Maternal Parenting. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2004 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 135-146.
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Neighborhood Cohesion as a Buffer Against Hostile Maternal Parenting. / Silk, Jennifer S.; Sessa, Frances M.; Morris, Amanda; Steinberg, Laurence; Avenevoli, Shelli.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.03.2004, p. 135-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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