Nanotoxicology and metalloestrogens: Possible involvement in breast cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the use of nanotechnology has expanded, an increased number of metallic oxides have been manufactured, yet toxicology testing has lagged significantly. Metals used in nano-products include titanium, silicon, aluminum, silver, zinc, cadmium, cobalt, antimony, gold, etc. Even the noble metals, platinum and cerium, have been used as a treatment for cancer, but the toxicity of these metals is still unknown. Significant advances have been made in our understanding and treatment of breast cancer, yet millions of women will experience invasive breast cancer in their lifetime. The pathogenesis of breast cancer can involve multiple factors; (1) genetic; (2) environmental; and (3) lifestyle-related factors. This review focuses on exposure to highly toxic metals, ("metalloestrogens" or "endocrine disruptors") that are used as the metallic foundation for nanoparticle production and are found in a variety of consumer products such as cosmetics, household items, and processed foods, etc. The linkage between well-understood metalloestrogens such as cadmium, the use of these metals in the production of nanoparticles, and the relationship between their potential estrogenic effects and the development of breast cancer will be explored. This will underscore the need for additional testing of materials used in nano-products. Clearly, a significant amount of work needs to be done to further our understanding of these metals and their potential role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-413
Number of pages24
JournalToxics
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Oct 2015

Fingerprint

Metals
Breast Neoplasms
Cadmium
Processed foods
Nanoparticles
Cerium
Endocrine Disruptors
Antimony
Consumer products
Metal Nanoparticles
Cosmetics
Poisons
Materials Testing
Testing
Silicon
Precious metals
Cobalt
Titanium
Platinum
Nanotechnology

Keywords

  • Aluminum
  • Cadmium
  • Heavy metal
  • Metalloestrogen
  • Nanotoxicology
  • Silicon
  • Silver
  • Titanium

Cite this

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Nanotoxicology and metalloestrogens : Possible involvement in breast cancer. / Wallace, David R.

In: Toxics, Vol. 3, No. 4, 28.10.2015, p. 390-413.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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