Link Between Monitoring Behavior and Adolescent Adjustment: An Analysis of Direct and Indirect Effects

Michael M. Criss, Tammy K. Lee, Amanda Morris, Lixian Cui, Cara D. Bosler, Karina Shreffler, Jennifer S. Silk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the current investigation was to explore whether monitoring behavior (i.e., parental solicitation, child disclosure, and parental involvement) was directly and indirectly (via parental knowledge and parent–youth openness) related to adolescent adjustment (i.e., antisocial behavior, substance use, and school grades). The sample consisted of 206 families with adolescents (ages 10–18 years) from predominantly low-income, high-risk neighborhoods. Monitoring behavior (parent reports), parental knowledge and parent–youth openness (youth reports), and adolescent adjustment (parent and youth reports) were all based on questionnaire data collected during a laboratory assessment. Results showed that when the monitoring behavior factors were examined simultaneously, only child disclosure was significantly and inversely related to youth antisocial behavior. In contrast, only parental involvement was significantly associated with less substance use. Moreover, school grades were significantly and incrementally predicted by both child disclosure and parental involvement. Parental solicitation was not significantly related to any of the adolescent outcomes. The findings also demonstrated evidence of indirect effects (via parental knowledge) in the link between monitoring behavior and adolescent adjustment. Implications regarding the socialization process during adolescence are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)668-678
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Adolescent Behavior
monitoring
adolescent
Disclosure
parents
school grade
only child
socialization
adolescence
Socialization
Only Child
low income
questionnaire
evidence

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Adolescents
  • Antisocial behavior
  • Child disclosure
  • Parental monitoring
  • Parenting

Cite this

Criss, Michael M. ; Lee, Tammy K. ; Morris, Amanda ; Cui, Lixian ; Bosler, Cara D. ; Shreffler, Karina ; Silk, Jennifer S. / Link Between Monitoring Behavior and Adolescent Adjustment : An Analysis of Direct and Indirect Effects. In: Journal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 668-678.
@article{1b5c0c65834444bd9f063c5b693abbac,
title = "Link Between Monitoring Behavior and Adolescent Adjustment: An Analysis of Direct and Indirect Effects",
abstract = "The purpose of the current investigation was to explore whether monitoring behavior (i.e., parental solicitation, child disclosure, and parental involvement) was directly and indirectly (via parental knowledge and parent–youth openness) related to adolescent adjustment (i.e., antisocial behavior, substance use, and school grades). The sample consisted of 206 families with adolescents (ages 10–18 years) from predominantly low-income, high-risk neighborhoods. Monitoring behavior (parent reports), parental knowledge and parent–youth openness (youth reports), and adolescent adjustment (parent and youth reports) were all based on questionnaire data collected during a laboratory assessment. Results showed that when the monitoring behavior factors were examined simultaneously, only child disclosure was significantly and inversely related to youth antisocial behavior. In contrast, only parental involvement was significantly associated with less substance use. Moreover, school grades were significantly and incrementally predicted by both child disclosure and parental involvement. Parental solicitation was not significantly related to any of the adolescent outcomes. The findings also demonstrated evidence of indirect effects (via parental knowledge) in the link between monitoring behavior and adolescent adjustment. Implications regarding the socialization process during adolescence are discussed.",
keywords = "Academic achievement, Adolescents, Antisocial behavior, Child disclosure, Parental monitoring, Parenting",
author = "Criss, {Michael M.} and Lee, {Tammy K.} and Amanda Morris and Lixian Cui and Bosler, {Cara D.} and Karina Shreffler and Silk, {Jennifer S.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10826-013-9877-0",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "668--678",
journal = "Journal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring",
issn = "2190-5452",
publisher = "Springer Science + Business Media",
number = "1",

}

Link Between Monitoring Behavior and Adolescent Adjustment : An Analysis of Direct and Indirect Effects. / Criss, Michael M.; Lee, Tammy K.; Morris, Amanda; Cui, Lixian; Bosler, Cara D.; Shreffler, Karina; Silk, Jennifer S.

In: Journal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 668-678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Link Between Monitoring Behavior and Adolescent Adjustment

T2 - An Analysis of Direct and Indirect Effects

AU - Criss, Michael M.

AU - Lee, Tammy K.

AU - Morris, Amanda

AU - Cui, Lixian

AU - Bosler, Cara D.

AU - Shreffler, Karina

AU - Silk, Jennifer S.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - The purpose of the current investigation was to explore whether monitoring behavior (i.e., parental solicitation, child disclosure, and parental involvement) was directly and indirectly (via parental knowledge and parent–youth openness) related to adolescent adjustment (i.e., antisocial behavior, substance use, and school grades). The sample consisted of 206 families with adolescents (ages 10–18 years) from predominantly low-income, high-risk neighborhoods. Monitoring behavior (parent reports), parental knowledge and parent–youth openness (youth reports), and adolescent adjustment (parent and youth reports) were all based on questionnaire data collected during a laboratory assessment. Results showed that when the monitoring behavior factors were examined simultaneously, only child disclosure was significantly and inversely related to youth antisocial behavior. In contrast, only parental involvement was significantly associated with less substance use. Moreover, school grades were significantly and incrementally predicted by both child disclosure and parental involvement. Parental solicitation was not significantly related to any of the adolescent outcomes. The findings also demonstrated evidence of indirect effects (via parental knowledge) in the link between monitoring behavior and adolescent adjustment. Implications regarding the socialization process during adolescence are discussed.

AB - The purpose of the current investigation was to explore whether monitoring behavior (i.e., parental solicitation, child disclosure, and parental involvement) was directly and indirectly (via parental knowledge and parent–youth openness) related to adolescent adjustment (i.e., antisocial behavior, substance use, and school grades). The sample consisted of 206 families with adolescents (ages 10–18 years) from predominantly low-income, high-risk neighborhoods. Monitoring behavior (parent reports), parental knowledge and parent–youth openness (youth reports), and adolescent adjustment (parent and youth reports) were all based on questionnaire data collected during a laboratory assessment. Results showed that when the monitoring behavior factors were examined simultaneously, only child disclosure was significantly and inversely related to youth antisocial behavior. In contrast, only parental involvement was significantly associated with less substance use. Moreover, school grades were significantly and incrementally predicted by both child disclosure and parental involvement. Parental solicitation was not significantly related to any of the adolescent outcomes. The findings also demonstrated evidence of indirect effects (via parental knowledge) in the link between monitoring behavior and adolescent adjustment. Implications regarding the socialization process during adolescence are discussed.

KW - Academic achievement

KW - Adolescents

KW - Antisocial behavior

KW - Child disclosure

KW - Parental monitoring

KW - Parenting

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923641493&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10826-013-9877-0

DO - 10.1007/s10826-013-9877-0

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85028212723

VL - 5

SP - 668

EP - 678

JO - Journal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring

JF - Journal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring

SN - 2190-5452

IS - 1

ER -