Is Dry Needling an Effective Treatment for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome : A Critically Appraised Topic

Samantha Austin, Paxtyn K. Watkins, Jennifer Volberding

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

Clinical scenario: Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) is a common knee pathology found often in females. The poor biomechanical and neuromuscular factors that contribute to the dysfunction and pain seen with PFPS may be addressed with the implantation of dry needling techniques.

Clinical Question: Is dry needling an effective treatment method for decreasing pain and increasing function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome?

Summary of Key Findings: Two studies demonstrated that dry needling in combination with traditional knee therapy increases the function and pain in those with PFPS. One study found improvement in pain, physical function, and VMO/VL coordination in PFPS patients. One study demonstrated that those given dry needling experienced a clinically meaningful reduction of pain.

Clinical Bottom Line: The evidence suggests that the use of dry needling as a therapeutic technique improves pain and overall function in individuals with PFPS, especially in conjunction with traditional strength training rehabilitation.

Strength of Recommendation: Based on the PEDro scale grading criteria, these studies provide good to excellent evidence that dry needling can increase function and decrease pain for individuals with PFPS.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages17
StatePublished - 16 Feb 2024
Event
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Research Week 2024
- Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, Tulsa, United States
Duration: 13 Feb 202417 Feb 2024
https://medicine.okstate.edu/research/research_days.html

Conference

Conference
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences Research Week 2024
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityTulsa
Period13/02/2417/02/24
Internet address

Keywords

  • knee pain
  • function
  • anterior knee pain
  • pain reduction

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