From clinical practice guideline development to trial registration: A systematic investigation of research pipeline for inflammatory bowel disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Clinical practice guidelines help practitioners manage patients in an effective and systematic way, and they assist in making evidence-based decisions related to diagnosis and treatment. Each recommendation is ranked based on evidence. The goal of this study is to determine gaps in research for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by using the low-level evidence recommendations. Methods: We extracted low-level evidence recommendations set forth by the American College of Gastroenterology in IBD, ulcerative colitis (UC), and Crohn’s disease. ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and PubMed were then used to locate studies relevant to the recommendations. Results: There were 30 low-level evidence recommendations, and 23 had recent or ongoing studies addressing them. We screened 2938 trials and 4321 published articles, 221 of which addressed low-quality recommendations. There were five recommendations that received the majority of research attention (143/221, 65%). Conclusion: This study used clinical practice guidelines to help determine areas of needed research in IBD, UC, and Crohn’s disease. By searching trial registries and articles indexed on PubMed, we identified the extent to which studies were being conducted to address research gaps. Of the gaps identified, five recommendations received most of the attention. While most of the significant gaps had some recent or ongoing research, our study found several areas where investigation is still needed. Clinical practice guidelines are an effective method to prioritize future research. [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-262
Number of pages16
JournalIndian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Practice Guidelines
Research
Ulcerative Colitis
PubMed
Crohn Disease
Registries
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Crohn’s disease
  • Research gaps
  • Ulcerative colitis

Cite this

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title = "From clinical practice guideline development to trial registration: A systematic investigation of research pipeline for inflammatory bowel disease",
abstract = "Background: Clinical practice guidelines help practitioners manage patients in an effective and systematic way, and they assist in making evidence-based decisions related to diagnosis and treatment. Each recommendation is ranked based on evidence. The goal of this study is to determine gaps in research for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by using the low-level evidence recommendations. Methods: We extracted low-level evidence recommendations set forth by the American College of Gastroenterology in IBD, ulcerative colitis (UC), and Crohn’s disease. ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and PubMed were then used to locate studies relevant to the recommendations. Results: There were 30 low-level evidence recommendations, and 23 had recent or ongoing studies addressing them. We screened 2938 trials and 4321 published articles, 221 of which addressed low-quality recommendations. There were five recommendations that received the majority of research attention (143/221, 65{\%}). Conclusion: This study used clinical practice guidelines to help determine areas of needed research in IBD, UC, and Crohn’s disease. By searching trial registries and articles indexed on PubMed, we identified the extent to which studies were being conducted to address research gaps. Of the gaps identified, five recommendations received most of the attention. While most of the significant gaps had some recent or ongoing research, our study found several areas where investigation is still needed. Clinical practice guidelines are an effective method to prioritize future research. [Figure not available: see fulltext.].",
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author = "Chase Meyer and Aaron Bowers and Heavener, {Trace E.} and Checketts, {Jake X.} and Matt Vassar",
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AB - Background: Clinical practice guidelines help practitioners manage patients in an effective and systematic way, and they assist in making evidence-based decisions related to diagnosis and treatment. Each recommendation is ranked based on evidence. The goal of this study is to determine gaps in research for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by using the low-level evidence recommendations. Methods: We extracted low-level evidence recommendations set forth by the American College of Gastroenterology in IBD, ulcerative colitis (UC), and Crohn’s disease. ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and PubMed were then used to locate studies relevant to the recommendations. Results: There were 30 low-level evidence recommendations, and 23 had recent or ongoing studies addressing them. We screened 2938 trials and 4321 published articles, 221 of which addressed low-quality recommendations. There were five recommendations that received the majority of research attention (143/221, 65%). Conclusion: This study used clinical practice guidelines to help determine areas of needed research in IBD, UC, and Crohn’s disease. By searching trial registries and articles indexed on PubMed, we identified the extent to which studies were being conducted to address research gaps. Of the gaps identified, five recommendations received most of the attention. While most of the significant gaps had some recent or ongoing research, our study found several areas where investigation is still needed. Clinical practice guidelines are an effective method to prioritize future research. [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

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