Family Interactions, Exposure to Violence, and Emotion Regulation: Perceptions of Children and Early Adolescents at Risk

Benjamin J. Houltberg, Carolyn S. Henry, Amanda Sheffield Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the protective nature of youth reports of family interactions in relation to perceived exposure to violence and anger regulation in 84 children and early adolescents (mean age of 10.5; 7- 15 years old) primarily from ethnic minority groups and living in high-risk communities in a large southwestern city. Path analysis and bootstrapping methodology indicated that overall family system variables were primarily associated with anger regulation and exposure to violence through parenting behaviors. Specifically, perceptions of family cohesion and adaptability were indirectly associated with anger regulation through a positive association with parental support. Family cohesion and adaptability were indirectly associated with anger regulation and exposure to violence through parental supervision in different ways. Family cohesion was positively associated with parental supervision, whereas family adaptability was negatively associated with parental supervision. Implications are discussed for intervention and prevention programs aimed at youth residing in areas with economic disadvantage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-296
Number of pages14
JournalFamily Relations
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2012

Keywords

  • At-risk children and families
  • Emotion regulation
  • Exposure to violence
  • Family system
  • Parenting

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