Exercise responses after altitude acclimatization are retained during reintroduction to altitude

Beth A. Beidleman, Stephen R. Muza, Paul Rock, Charles S. Fulco, Timothy P. Lyons, Reed W. Hoyt, Allen Cymerman

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Abstract

Following 2 to 3 wk of altitude acclimatization, ventilation is increased and heart rate (HR), plasma volume (PV), and lactate accumulation ([La]) are decreased during submaximal exercise. The objective of this study was to determine whether some degree of these exercise responses associated with acclimatization would be retained upon reintroduction to altitude (RA) after 8 d at sea level (SL). Six male lowlanders (X̄ ± SE; 31 ± 2 yr, 82.4 ± 4.6 kg) exercised to exhaustion at the same relative percentages of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O(2peak)) at SL, on acute altitude (AA) exposure, after a 16-d chronic altitude (CA) exposure on Pikes Peak (4,300 m), and during a 3- to 4-h RA in a hypobaric chamber (4,300 m; 446 mm Hg) after 8 d at SL. The submaximal exercise to exhaustion time (min) was the same at SL (66.0 ± 1.6), AA (67.7 ± 7.3), CA (79.9 ± 6.2), and RA (67.9 ± 1.9). At 75% V̇O(2peak): (1) arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) increased from AA to CA (67.0 ± 1.5 vs 78.5 ± 1.8%; P < 0.05) and remained increased at RA (77.0 ± 2.0%); (2) HR decreased from SL to CA (171 ± 6 vs 152 ± 9 beats·min-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (157 ± 5 beats·min-1); (3) calculated PV decreased 6.9 ± 10.0% at AA, 21.3 ± 11.1% at CA, and 16.7 ± 5.4% at RA from SL baseline values, and (4) [La] decreased from AA to CA (5.1 ± 0.9 vs 1.9 ± 0.4 mmol·L-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (2.6 ± 0.6 mmol·L-1). Upon RA after 8 d at SL, the acclimatization responses were retained 92 ± 9% for SaO2, 74 ± 8% for PV, and 58 ± 3% for [La] at 75% V̇(2peak). In conclusion, although submaximal exercise to exhaustion time is not improved upon reintroduction to altitude after 8 d at sea level, retention of beneficial exercise responses associated with altitude acclimatization is likely in individuals whose work, athletic competition, or recreation schedules involve intermittent sojourns to high elevations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1588-1595
Number of pages8
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume29
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 1997

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Acclimatization
Oceans and Seas
Plasma Volume
Lactic Acid
Heart Rate
Esocidae
Oxygen
Recreation

Keywords

  • DEACCLIMATIZATION
  • HEART RATE
  • LACTATE
  • PLASMA VOLUME
  • VENTILATION

Cite this

Beidleman, Beth A. ; Muza, Stephen R. ; Rock, Paul ; Fulco, Charles S. ; Lyons, Timothy P. ; Hoyt, Reed W. ; Cymerman, Allen. / Exercise responses after altitude acclimatization are retained during reintroduction to altitude. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1997 ; Vol. 29, No. 12. pp. 1588-1595.
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abstract = "Following 2 to 3 wk of altitude acclimatization, ventilation is increased and heart rate (HR), plasma volume (PV), and lactate accumulation ([La]) are decreased during submaximal exercise. The objective of this study was to determine whether some degree of these exercise responses associated with acclimatization would be retained upon reintroduction to altitude (RA) after 8 d at sea level (SL). Six male lowlanders (X̄ ± SE; 31 ± 2 yr, 82.4 ± 4.6 kg) exercised to exhaustion at the same relative percentages of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O(2peak)) at SL, on acute altitude (AA) exposure, after a 16-d chronic altitude (CA) exposure on Pikes Peak (4,300 m), and during a 3- to 4-h RA in a hypobaric chamber (4,300 m; 446 mm Hg) after 8 d at SL. The submaximal exercise to exhaustion time (min) was the same at SL (66.0 ± 1.6), AA (67.7 ± 7.3), CA (79.9 ± 6.2), and RA (67.9 ± 1.9). At 75{\%} V̇O(2peak): (1) arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) increased from AA to CA (67.0 ± 1.5 vs 78.5 ± 1.8{\%}; P < 0.05) and remained increased at RA (77.0 ± 2.0{\%}); (2) HR decreased from SL to CA (171 ± 6 vs 152 ± 9 beats·min-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (157 ± 5 beats·min-1); (3) calculated PV decreased 6.9 ± 10.0{\%} at AA, 21.3 ± 11.1{\%} at CA, and 16.7 ± 5.4{\%} at RA from SL baseline values, and (4) [La] decreased from AA to CA (5.1 ± 0.9 vs 1.9 ± 0.4 mmol·L-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (2.6 ± 0.6 mmol·L-1). Upon RA after 8 d at SL, the acclimatization responses were retained 92 ± 9{\%} for SaO2, 74 ± 8{\%} for PV, and 58 ± 3{\%} for [La] at 75{\%} V̇(2peak). In conclusion, although submaximal exercise to exhaustion time is not improved upon reintroduction to altitude after 8 d at sea level, retention of beneficial exercise responses associated with altitude acclimatization is likely in individuals whose work, athletic competition, or recreation schedules involve intermittent sojourns to high elevations.",
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Exercise responses after altitude acclimatization are retained during reintroduction to altitude. / Beidleman, Beth A.; Muza, Stephen R.; Rock, Paul; Fulco, Charles S.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Hoyt, Reed W.; Cymerman, Allen.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 29, No. 12, 01.12.1997, p. 1588-1595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Exercise responses after altitude acclimatization are retained during reintroduction to altitude

AU - Beidleman, Beth A.

AU - Muza, Stephen R.

AU - Rock, Paul

AU - Fulco, Charles S.

AU - Lyons, Timothy P.

AU - Hoyt, Reed W.

AU - Cymerman, Allen

PY - 1997/12/1

Y1 - 1997/12/1

N2 - Following 2 to 3 wk of altitude acclimatization, ventilation is increased and heart rate (HR), plasma volume (PV), and lactate accumulation ([La]) are decreased during submaximal exercise. The objective of this study was to determine whether some degree of these exercise responses associated with acclimatization would be retained upon reintroduction to altitude (RA) after 8 d at sea level (SL). Six male lowlanders (X̄ ± SE; 31 ± 2 yr, 82.4 ± 4.6 kg) exercised to exhaustion at the same relative percentages of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O(2peak)) at SL, on acute altitude (AA) exposure, after a 16-d chronic altitude (CA) exposure on Pikes Peak (4,300 m), and during a 3- to 4-h RA in a hypobaric chamber (4,300 m; 446 mm Hg) after 8 d at SL. The submaximal exercise to exhaustion time (min) was the same at SL (66.0 ± 1.6), AA (67.7 ± 7.3), CA (79.9 ± 6.2), and RA (67.9 ± 1.9). At 75% V̇O(2peak): (1) arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) increased from AA to CA (67.0 ± 1.5 vs 78.5 ± 1.8%; P < 0.05) and remained increased at RA (77.0 ± 2.0%); (2) HR decreased from SL to CA (171 ± 6 vs 152 ± 9 beats·min-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (157 ± 5 beats·min-1); (3) calculated PV decreased 6.9 ± 10.0% at AA, 21.3 ± 11.1% at CA, and 16.7 ± 5.4% at RA from SL baseline values, and (4) [La] decreased from AA to CA (5.1 ± 0.9 vs 1.9 ± 0.4 mmol·L-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (2.6 ± 0.6 mmol·L-1). Upon RA after 8 d at SL, the acclimatization responses were retained 92 ± 9% for SaO2, 74 ± 8% for PV, and 58 ± 3% for [La] at 75% V̇(2peak). In conclusion, although submaximal exercise to exhaustion time is not improved upon reintroduction to altitude after 8 d at sea level, retention of beneficial exercise responses associated with altitude acclimatization is likely in individuals whose work, athletic competition, or recreation schedules involve intermittent sojourns to high elevations.

AB - Following 2 to 3 wk of altitude acclimatization, ventilation is increased and heart rate (HR), plasma volume (PV), and lactate accumulation ([La]) are decreased during submaximal exercise. The objective of this study was to determine whether some degree of these exercise responses associated with acclimatization would be retained upon reintroduction to altitude (RA) after 8 d at sea level (SL). Six male lowlanders (X̄ ± SE; 31 ± 2 yr, 82.4 ± 4.6 kg) exercised to exhaustion at the same relative percentages of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O(2peak)) at SL, on acute altitude (AA) exposure, after a 16-d chronic altitude (CA) exposure on Pikes Peak (4,300 m), and during a 3- to 4-h RA in a hypobaric chamber (4,300 m; 446 mm Hg) after 8 d at SL. The submaximal exercise to exhaustion time (min) was the same at SL (66.0 ± 1.6), AA (67.7 ± 7.3), CA (79.9 ± 6.2), and RA (67.9 ± 1.9). At 75% V̇O(2peak): (1) arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) increased from AA to CA (67.0 ± 1.5 vs 78.5 ± 1.8%; P < 0.05) and remained increased at RA (77.0 ± 2.0%); (2) HR decreased from SL to CA (171 ± 6 vs 152 ± 9 beats·min-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (157 ± 5 beats·min-1); (3) calculated PV decreased 6.9 ± 10.0% at AA, 21.3 ± 11.1% at CA, and 16.7 ± 5.4% at RA from SL baseline values, and (4) [La] decreased from AA to CA (5.1 ± 0.9 vs 1.9 ± 0.4 mmol·L-1; P < 0.05) and remained decreased at RA (2.6 ± 0.6 mmol·L-1). Upon RA after 8 d at SL, the acclimatization responses were retained 92 ± 9% for SaO2, 74 ± 8% for PV, and 58 ± 3% for [La] at 75% V̇(2peak). In conclusion, although submaximal exercise to exhaustion time is not improved upon reintroduction to altitude after 8 d at sea level, retention of beneficial exercise responses associated with altitude acclimatization is likely in individuals whose work, athletic competition, or recreation schedules involve intermittent sojourns to high elevations.

KW - DEACCLIMATIZATION

KW - HEART RATE

KW - LACTATE

KW - PLASMA VOLUME

KW - VENTILATION

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