Effects of erythrocyte infusion on V̇O(2max) at high altitude

Andrew J. Young, Michael N. Sawka, Stephen R. Muza, Robert Boushel, Timothy Lyons, Paul Rock, Beau J. Freund, Ray Waters, Allen Cymerman, Kent B. Pandolf, C. Robert Valeri

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Abstract

This study investigated whether autologous erythrocyte infusion would ameliorate the decrement in maximal O2 uptake (V̇O(2max)) experienced by lowlanders when they ascend to high altitude. V̇O(2max) was measured in 16 men (treadmill running) at sea level (SL) and on the 1st (HA1) and 9th (HA9) days of high-altitude (4,300 m) residence. After V̇O(2max) was measured at SL, subjects were divided into two matched groups (n = 8). Twenty-four hours before ascent to high altitude, the experimental group received a 700-ml infusion of autologous erythrocytes and saline (42% hematocrit), whereas the control group received only saline. The V̇O(2max) of erythrocyte-infused [54 ± 1 (SE) ml · kg-1 · min-1] and control subjects (52 ± 2 ml · kg- 1 · min-1) did not differ at SL before infusion. The decrement in V̇O(2max) on HA1 did not differ between groups, averaging 26% overall, despite higher (P < 0.01) arterial hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, and arterial O2 content in the erythrocyte-infused subjects. By HA9, there were no longer any differences in hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, or arterial O2 content between groups. No change in V̇O(2max) occurred between HA1 and HA9 for either group. Thus, despite increasing arterial O2-carrying capacity, autologous erythrocyte infusion did not ameliorate the decrement in V̇O(2max) at 4,300-m altitude.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-259
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1996

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Erythrocytes
Hematocrit
Oceans and Seas
Hemoglobins
Conservation of Natural Resources
Research Design
Control Groups

Keywords

  • blood doping
  • exercise
  • hypoxia
  • maximal oxygen uptake
  • oxygen transport

Cite this

Young, A. J., Sawka, M. N., Muza, S. R., Boushel, R., Lyons, T., Rock, P., ... Valeri, C. R. (1996). Effects of erythrocyte infusion on V̇O(2max) at high altitude. Journal of Applied Physiology, 81(1), 252-259. https://doi.org/10.1152/jappl.1996.81.1.252
Young, Andrew J. ; Sawka, Michael N. ; Muza, Stephen R. ; Boushel, Robert ; Lyons, Timothy ; Rock, Paul ; Freund, Beau J. ; Waters, Ray ; Cymerman, Allen ; Pandolf, Kent B. ; Valeri, C. Robert. / Effects of erythrocyte infusion on V̇O(2max) at high altitude. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1996 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 252-259.
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abstract = "This study investigated whether autologous erythrocyte infusion would ameliorate the decrement in maximal O2 uptake (V̇O(2max)) experienced by lowlanders when they ascend to high altitude. V̇O(2max) was measured in 16 men (treadmill running) at sea level (SL) and on the 1st (HA1) and 9th (HA9) days of high-altitude (4,300 m) residence. After V̇O(2max) was measured at SL, subjects were divided into two matched groups (n = 8). Twenty-four hours before ascent to high altitude, the experimental group received a 700-ml infusion of autologous erythrocytes and saline (42{\%} hematocrit), whereas the control group received only saline. The V̇O(2max) of erythrocyte-infused [54 ± 1 (SE) ml · kg-1 · min-1] and control subjects (52 ± 2 ml · kg- 1 · min-1) did not differ at SL before infusion. The decrement in V̇O(2max) on HA1 did not differ between groups, averaging 26{\%} overall, despite higher (P < 0.01) arterial hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, and arterial O2 content in the erythrocyte-infused subjects. By HA9, there were no longer any differences in hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, or arterial O2 content between groups. No change in V̇O(2max) occurred between HA1 and HA9 for either group. Thus, despite increasing arterial O2-carrying capacity, autologous erythrocyte infusion did not ameliorate the decrement in V̇O(2max) at 4,300-m altitude.",
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Young, AJ, Sawka, MN, Muza, SR, Boushel, R, Lyons, T, Rock, P, Freund, BJ, Waters, R, Cymerman, A, Pandolf, KB & Valeri, CR 1996, 'Effects of erythrocyte infusion on V̇O(2max) at high altitude', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 81, no. 1, pp. 252-259. https://doi.org/10.1152/jappl.1996.81.1.252

Effects of erythrocyte infusion on V̇O(2max) at high altitude. / Young, Andrew J.; Sawka, Michael N.; Muza, Stephen R.; Boushel, Robert; Lyons, Timothy; Rock, Paul; Freund, Beau J.; Waters, Ray; Cymerman, Allen; Pandolf, Kent B.; Valeri, C. Robert.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 81, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 252-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Rock, Paul

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AU - Cymerman, Allen

AU - Pandolf, Kent B.

AU - Valeri, C. Robert

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