Effects of a two-generation human capital program on low-income parents' education, employment, and psychological wellbeing

P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Terri J. Sabol, Teresa Eckrich Sommer, Elise Chor, Allison W. Cooperman, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Christopher King, Amanda Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two-generation human capital programs for families provide education and workforce training for parents simultaneously with education for children. This study uses a quasi-experimental design to examine the effects of a model two-generation program, CareerAdvance, which recruits parents of children enrolled in Head Start into a health care workforce training program. After 1 year, CareerAdvance parents demonstrated higher rates of certification and employment in the health care sector than did matched-comparison parents whose children were also in Head Start. More important, there was no effect on parents' short-term levels of income or employment across all sectors. CareerAdvance parents also experienced psychological benefits, reporting higher levels of self-efficacy and optimism, in addition to stronger career identity compared with the matched-comparison group. Notably, even as CareerAdvance parents juggled the demands of school, family, and employment, they did not report higher levels of material hardship or stress compared with the matched-comparison group. These findings are discussed in terms of the implications of a family perspective for human capital programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-443
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

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Parents
Economics
Psychology
Education
Research Design
Health Manpower
Health Care Sector
Certification
Self Efficacy
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Education and training
  • Low-income parents
  • Two-generation programs
  • Workforce development

Cite this

Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay ; Sabol, Terri J. ; Sommer, Teresa Eckrich ; Chor, Elise ; Cooperman, Allison W. ; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu ; King, Christopher ; Morris, Amanda. / Effects of a two-generation human capital program on low-income parents' education, employment, and psychological wellbeing. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2019 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 433-443.
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Chase-Lansdale, PL, Sabol, TJ, Sommer, TE, Chor, E, Cooperman, AW, Brooks-Gunn, J, Yoshikawa, H, King, C & Morris, A 2019, 'Effects of a two-generation human capital program on low-income parents' education, employment, and psychological wellbeing', Journal of Family Psychology, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 433-443. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000517

Effects of a two-generation human capital program on low-income parents' education, employment, and psychological wellbeing. / Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Sabol, Terri J.; Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Chor, Elise; Cooperman, Allison W.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; King, Christopher; Morris, Amanda.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 33, No. 4, 06.2019, p. 433-443.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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