Development and Implementation of a Hybrid Online and In-Person Food Sovereignty and Nutrition Education Curriculum for Native American Parents: The FRESH Study

Alyson Haslam, Charlotte Love, Tori Taniguchi, Mary B. Williams, Marianna S. Wetherill, Susan Sisson, Ashley E. Weedn, Tvli Jacob, Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Food Resource Equity and Sustainability for Health (“FRESH”) study is an Indigenous-led intervention to increase vegetable and fruit intake among Native American children. As part of this study, we developed a hybrid (online and in-person) food sovereignty and nutrition education curriculum for the parents of these children. This 16-week curriculum was developed to promote household- and community-level healthy eating and food sovereignty practices to parents of preschool-aged children residing in Osage Nation, Oklahoma. A total of 81 parent/caregivers participated in the curriculum component of the FRESH study, with a median age of 34 years (range: 23–54 years). Most study participants were female (88.9%) and less than half (45.7%) had an annual household income of more than US$50,000. Most were married or had a significant other (76.5%) and worked full-time (65.4%). The median total number of children in the home <18 years of age was three (range: 1–8). Participation among the 94 parents was 56% during the first week and was 12% in the final week. Having some college or technical training (vs. having a college degree) and having an annual household income of US$20,000–US$50,000 (vs. more than US$50,000) were associated with fewer sessions attended (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively) Being married (vs. not) was associated with higher attendance (p <.0001). Participation in a hybrid food sovereignty and nutrition education curriculum for parents was generally low, but income, education, and marital status were associated with curriculum participation. Our research adds to the literature by describing the development and implementation of this curriculum and recommendations for future research incorporating Indigenous approaches to health.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • community-based participatory research
  • food sovereignty
  • hybrid curriculum
  • multi-sector intervention
  • native American
  • nutrition education

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