Cardiocirculatory responses to upright tilt at sea level and high altitude.

M. A. Hameed, C. S. Fulco, A. Cymerman, Paul Rock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A collaborative study was conducted to measure the cardiocirculatory responses to upright tilt in eight young men at sea level (SL); after 1h at 4300m simulated altitude (SA) and at 18h, 66h and 114h during residence at 4300m (HA). Heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), calf blood flow (CBF), blood pressure (BP) and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were obtained during supine rest and after 13 min of 60 degrees head-up tilt using an impedance monitor and an electrosphygmomanometer. SL to HA changes in blood volume (BV) were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Supine HR, TPR and BP were increased while SV, CO and CBP were reduced SL to HA (P less than .05). HR and BP in the upright position were increased SL to HA (P less than .05). The responses to tilt (delta supine to upright) were unaltered SL vs SA. With prolonged exposure, SV, CO, TPR and CBP responses to tilt were reduced (P less than .05). The reduced responses to tilt at HA were associated with a 10% decline in BV (P less than .01). It was concluded that the reduction in SV during tilt at SL and SA was compensated for by increases in HR and TPR in order to maintain BP. After 18h HA, BP in the upright position was maintained only by an increase in HR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)306-310
Number of pages5
JournalJPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
Volume41
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1991

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title = "Cardiocirculatory responses to upright tilt at sea level and high altitude.",
abstract = "A collaborative study was conducted to measure the cardiocirculatory responses to upright tilt in eight young men at sea level (SL); after 1h at 4300m simulated altitude (SA) and at 18h, 66h and 114h during residence at 4300m (HA). Heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), calf blood flow (CBF), blood pressure (BP) and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were obtained during supine rest and after 13 min of 60 degrees head-up tilt using an impedance monitor and an electrosphygmomanometer. SL to HA changes in blood volume (BV) were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Supine HR, TPR and BP were increased while SV, CO and CBP were reduced SL to HA (P less than .05). HR and BP in the upright position were increased SL to HA (P less than .05). The responses to tilt (delta supine to upright) were unaltered SL vs SA. With prolonged exposure, SV, CO, TPR and CBP responses to tilt were reduced (P less than .05). The reduced responses to tilt at HA were associated with a 10{\%} decline in BV (P less than .01). It was concluded that the reduction in SV during tilt at SL and SA was compensated for by increases in HR and TPR in order to maintain BP. After 18h HA, BP in the upright position was maintained only by an increase in HR.",
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Cardiocirculatory responses to upright tilt at sea level and high altitude. / Hameed, M. A.; Fulco, C. S.; Cymerman, A.; Rock, Paul.

In: JPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association, Vol. 41, No. 12, 01.01.1991, p. 306-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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