Brief field-based intervention to reduce alcohol-related problems among men who have sex with men

Julie Croff, John D. Clapp, Christina D. Chambers, Susan I. Woodruff, Steffanie A. Strathdee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study evaluated the utility of a brief field-based intervention to reduce alcohol use and alcohol-related problems among men who have sex with men. Method: A randomized control trial was designed to test a brief alcohol intervention against an attention-placebo control intervention. Over a 13-week period in fall 2009, a sample (n = 152) of men who have sex with men was recruited at a local gay bar in San Diego, CA, and were randomized to a brief alcohol intervention or an attention-placebo control group. Sober bar patrons were recruited before bar entrance and asked to undergo a brief survey and give a breath alcohol sample at exit from the bar. Results: Breath alcohol concentrations at exit from the bar were not significantly different between those in the experimental alcohol feedback condition and those in the attention-placebo control condition. However, among participants in the experimental condition, those categorized as high risk for alcohol-related problems at entrance drank significantly less than planned as compared with participants categorized as low risk for alcohol-related problems. Conclusions: Brief, venue-based interventions may be appropriate for men who have sex with men who plan to drink at rates that would put them at higher risk of alcohol-related problems. Additional studies exploring the utility of brief intervention in risk settings are warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-289
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2012

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alcohol
Alcohols
Placebos
Feedback
Control Groups
Group

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Croff, Julie ; Clapp, John D. ; Chambers, Christina D. ; Woodruff, Susan I. ; Strathdee, Steffanie A. / Brief field-based intervention to reduce alcohol-related problems among men who have sex with men. In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. 2012 ; Vol. 73, No. 2. pp. 285-289.
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Brief field-based intervention to reduce alcohol-related problems among men who have sex with men. / Croff, Julie; Clapp, John D.; Chambers, Christina D.; Woodruff, Susan I.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 73, No. 2, 01.01.2012, p. 285-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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