An update on American Indian suicide in New Mexico, 1980-1987

Nancy Van Winkle, P. A. May

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper updates a previous study of American Indian suicide in New Mexico which covered the years 1957-1979. Rates for completed suicides among the Apache, Navajo, and Pueblo for 1980-1987 are compared to earlier rates, as are selected demographic and situational variables. Major findings suggest that suicide rates are stabilizing or declining for all three groups in the most recent years. For the Apache and Pueblo groups, however, this trend may just be the downswing of cycles that have been identified by this study. Age-specific rates for all three groups remain above US rates for most age groups under 55 years. Apache rates are still the highest, followed by Pueblo and Navajo rates. Suicide among all three groups continues to be primarily a young male phenomenon. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-315
Number of pages12
JournalHuman Organization
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1993

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American Indian
suicide
Mexico
Group
suicide rate
age group
American Indians
Suicide
trend
Pueblo

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An update on American Indian suicide in New Mexico, 1980-1987. / Van Winkle, Nancy; May, P. A.

In: Human Organization, Vol. 52, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 304-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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