Acute Mountain Sickness

T. Scott Johnson, Paul Rock

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

THE majority of persons who ascend rapidly to terrestrial elevations higher than approximately 2500 m (8200 ft) undergo an unpleasant period of acclimatization. During this time, they have a variety of symptoms, the most prominent of which are headache, nausea, vomiting, and insomnia, that are collectively referred to as acute mountain sickness.1 2 3 This paper reviews current concepts of the pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder. Factors that influence susceptibility to this condition will be discussed. Acute mountain sickness is part of a continuum of diseases related to ascension to high altitudes4 that includes the infrequent life-threatening conditions high-altitude pulmonary edema.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)841-845
Number of pages5
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume319
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 29 Sep 1988

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Altitude Sickness
Acclimatization
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Pulmonary Edema
Nausea
Vomiting
Headache
Therapeutics

Cite this

Johnson, T. Scott ; Rock, Paul. / Acute Mountain Sickness. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1988 ; Vol. 319, No. 13. pp. 841-845.
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Acute Mountain Sickness. / Johnson, T. Scott; Rock, Paul.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 319, No. 13, 29.09.1988, p. 841-845.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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