Acute Mountain Sickness

Wayne L. Callen, John L. Perna, Clifford J. Field, Sherilyne J. King, Ross Greenlee, Herbert J. Goldings, Erik R. Swenson, Thomas H. Maren, Brent A. Blue, T. Scott Johnson, Paul B. Rock

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

To the Editor: We would like to differ with Johnson and Rock (Sept. 29 issue)* in their statement that oxygen is a recommended but not clearly beneficial treatment for acute mountain sickness. We practice in Leadville, Colorado, at an altitude of 10,000 ft. This is the highest community in North America. We routinely treat many cases of acute mountain sickness during each season. Our clinical experience adds up to several hundred cases each. It is clearly beneficial to give people oxygen for acute mountain sickness. Both intermittent and continuous oxygen therapy relieve the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. It is…

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1492-1493
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume320
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 1989

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  • Cite this

    Callen, W. L., Perna, J. L., Field, C. J., King, S. J., Greenlee, R., Goldings, H. J., Swenson, E. R., Maren, T. H., Blue, B. A., Johnson, T. S., & Rock, P. B. (1989). Acute Mountain Sickness. New England Journal of Medicine, 320(22), 1492-1493. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198906013202212